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AWS access management is provided through AWS IAM - Identity and Access Management. AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) enables you to securely control access to AWS services and resources for your users. Using IAM, you can create and manage AWS users and groups, and use permissions to allow and deny their access to AWS resources. 

IAM is a feature of your AWS account offered at no additional charge. You will be charged only for use of other AWS services by your users.

IAM allows you to:

  • Manage IAM users and their access – You can create users in IAM, assign them individual security credentials (in other words, access keys, passwords, and multi-factor authentication devices), or request temporary security credentials to provide users access to AWS services and resources. You can manage permissions in order to control which operations a user can perform.
  • Manage IAM roles and their permissions – You can create roles in IAM and manage permissions to control which operations can be performed by the entity, or AWS service, that assumes the role. You can also define which entity is allowed to assume the role. In addition, you can use service-linked roles to delegate permissions to AWS services that create and manage AWS resources on your behalf.
  • Manage federated users and their permissions – You can enable identity federation to allow existing identities (users, groups, and roles) in your enterprise to access the AWS Management Console, call AWS APIs, and access resources, without the need to create an IAM user for each identity.

Access and Federation Edit

You can grant other people permission to administer and use resources in your AWS account without having to share your password or access key.

Also you can allow users who already have passwords elsewhere—for example, in your corporate Active Directory or with an Internet identity provider—to get access to your AWS account. You can use any identity management solution that supports SAML 2.0.

Granular Permissions Edit

You can grant different permissions to different people for different resources. For example, you might allow some users complete access to Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Redshift, and other AWS services. For other users, you can allow read-only access to just some S3 buckets, or permission to administer just some EC2 instances, or to access your billing information but nothing else.

IAM also enables you to add specific conditions such as time of day to control how a user can use AWS, their originating IP address, whether they are using SSL, or whether they have authenticated with a multi-factor authentication device.

Securing Application Access Edit

You can use IAM features to securely give applications that run on EC2 instances the credentials that they need in order to access other AWS resources, like S3 buckets and RDS or DynamoDB databases.

Multi Factor Authentication Edit

You can add two-factor authentication to your account and to individual users for extra security. With MFA you or your users must provide not only a password or access key to work with your account, but also a code from a specially configured device.